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Microsoft Highlights The Future Of Accessibility Online

Posted by Anna on October 26, 2016 at 5:17 pm. ADA, Consumer Advisory Board, Video Description, WCAG

Kelly sits at a desk next to his laptop.

Earlier today, Microsoft held their Windows 10 Event, a two-hour presentation of new products and features from the technology giant. Microsoft began with a video that underscores the importance of accessibility in the design process, stating: “We don’t build Windows 10 for all of us. We build Windows 10 for each of us.” While the video features how Windows 10 will be improved for people across a range of disabilities, it does a fantastic job of showcasing the enhancements for blind and low-vision screen reader users.

Senior Program Manager, Kelly, who is blind himself, is shown using Windows Narrator on his laptop with the voice sped up to increase efficiency. He says, “So right now we’re at about 80% of capacity of how Narrator could speak. And this is about how I would use my computer. That probably sounds like gibberish, but once you get used to this, it’s pretty quick.”

Most people are unfamiliar with screen reader technology, so it’s wonderful that Microsoft used a high-profile event to give greater context for its application. In past Consumer Advisory Board meetings, CaptionMax has asked its members to listen to different speeds of video description to help us determine how fast our narrators should speak when they record to optimize for quality and efficiency.

Text video description is another option that serves as a full alternative to the video, making it accessible to blind or low-vision individuals with screen reader technology and allowing them to choose their own speed. For several years, CaptionMax has provided text video description, also known as a “media alternative,” as a service for our clients who want to meet WCAG 2.0 Level A standards for their online video content.

We make media accessibility easy for our clients. In addition to helping them understand which services they need to become compliant and reach a wider audience, we offer the increased efficiency, security, and quality of having it all done under one roof. To learn more about WCAG 2.0 compliance, contact sales@captionmax.com.

CaptionMax Consumer Advisory Board Member Presents At First Ever Caption Studies Conference

Posted by Anna on August 4, 2016 at 4:01 pm. Captioning, Consumer Advisory Board
Deb Fels with the caption,

Researcher Deb Fels with the caption, "Welcome to my talk, entitled Captioning and Inclusive Design."

Earlier this week, the very first U.S. Caption Studies Conference was held online, bringing together caption users, creators, advocates, and researchers to promote areas of progress and engagement within the community, as well as set up the following goals:

- establish/initially celebrate Caption Studies as an area of research, advocacy, and practice;

- provide a space for practitioners, researchers, and advocates to present and share their work where captioning is the primary, instead of being a secondary, focus;

- connect, network, energize, and build momentum for all of us to promote captioning in our diverse fields;

- understand, explore, discuss, and advocate for more effective legislation.

The conference was also designed to be a proof-of-concept for interest in further Caption Studies conferences, either virtual or in person, and serve as a model of accessibility in online communications and conferences.

Our very own Consumer Advisory Board member, Deb Fels, was one of the presenters at this groundbreaking conference.  Her talk, “Captioning and Inclusive Design” focused on the research she and her colleague Margot Whitfield have done with Enhanced Captioning at the Inclusive Media and Design Centre at Ryerson University in Toronto. Enhanced Captioning embraces creative strategies to make captions a more satisfying and enriching experience for viewers, including color, kinetic text, and emojis:

A woman sings to a man in front of her. A music symbol is in the top left corner. At the bottom, a caption that says, Ill ignore you and forget you, is encircled in light pink with a heart emoji at the beginning.

A woman sings to a man in front of her. A music symbol is in the top left corner. At the bottom, a caption that says, "I'll ignore you and forget you," is encircled in light pink with a heart emoji at the beginning.

Deb also gave a wonderful overview of Inclusive Design principles and the dramatic impact considering accessibility upstream in the creative process can have in making entertainment and educational content of greater benefit to all people.

We are very proud to have her on our board and were delighted to see her research elevated in the field of Caption Studies at this conference.

CaptionMax 2015 Consumer Advisory Board Meeting

Posted by Anna on September 29, 2015 at 11:00 am. CVAA, Consumer Advisory Board, FCC, Video Describers, Video Description
CaptionMax executives, production staff, and Consumer Advisory Board members seated at a conference table

CaptionMax executives, production staff, and Consumer Advisory Board members seated at a conference table

September 26th marked CaptionMax’s 18th annual Consumer Advisory Board meeting, which was every bit as fun as it was productive. Our board members are consumers of video description and closed captioning, consumer advocates, and educators of blind and deaf children. They travel from near and far to come together and discuss the finer points of media accessibility, particularly within the realm of video description.

CaptionMax CAB members: Tim, Cathy, Ardis, and Joya

CaptionMax CAB members: Tim, Cathy, Ardis, and Joya

In addition to talking about larger regulatory facets of description, like the expansion from the top 25 largest local affiliates of ABC, CBS, NBC, and Fox to the top 60 television markets for the top four broadcast networks, the board discussed a number of scenarios that come up frequently. These scenarios included the best way to describe transitional shots, archaic technology, camera effects, flashbacks, and flash-forwards.  There was also a great deal of discussion regarding the nuance that goes into creating voice-over for different types of programming.

Our menu of topics for the day

Our menu of topics for the day

We owe a debt of gratitude to our board members for the time they spend with us each year. The wealth of insight their diversity of experience brings to our organization helps refine our best practices and grow our expertise in the field of media accessibility.

CaptionMax CAB members: Tim, Ardis, Cathy, Joya, and Jordan

CaptionMax CAB members: Tim, Ardis, Cathy, Joya, and Jordan

What’s the [bleep] deal with improperly censored captions?

Posted by Anna on January 10, 2014 at 4:08 pm. Captioning, Consumer Advisory Board
In order to create the captions, we receive a reference video from the producers of the program, usually before it airs for the very first time, and our captioners type what they hear. However, TV shows are distributed to a variety of different places nowadays, such as TV syndication, DVD, and streaming services. Shows are often edited after the first airing for different distribution methods. Sometimes the length changes, sometimes the content does. And on many networks, there are different profanity rules for the very same show depending on what time it airs. For instance, some words have to be bleeped out when a show airs at 8:00 but can be left in when it’s on after midnight. In those cases, producers generally have us caption the most restrictive version–the one with the most “bleeps”–to be on the safe side, because it would be time- and cost-prohibitive to create three separate masters for different airings of the same episode.
While we create the captions, they don’t belong to us, and once they leave our hands we don’t control where and how the CC files are used.  So hopefully this explanation helps clear up how this type of discrepancy can occur. I swear we mean no offense to the deaf community or other caption users.

Recently we have received some comments about instances where captions were censored where the audio was not. Please be assured that we here at CaptionMax can appreciate some salty talk with the best of them, and we never take it upon ourselves to censor language. Our employees and our advisory board feel that the whole point of captions is to accurately reflect the audio in order to level the playing field for people with different hearing and language capabilities.

In order to create the captions, we receive a reference video from the producers of the program, usually before it airs for the very first time, and our captioners type what they hear. However, TV shows are distributed to a variety of different places nowadays, such as TV syndication, DVD, and streaming services. Shows are often edited after the first airing for different distribution methods. Sometimes the length changes, sometimes the content does. And on many networks, there are different profanity rules for the very same show depending on what time it airs. For instance, some words have to be bleeped out when a show airs at 8:00 but can be left in when it’s on after midnight. In those cases, producers generally have us caption the most restrictive version–the one with the most “bleeps”–to be on the safe side, because it would be time- and cost-prohibitive to create three separate masters for different airings of the same episode.

While we create the captions, they don’t belong to us, and once they leave our hands we don’t control where and how the CC files are used.  So hopefully this explanation helps clear up how this type of discrepancy can occur. I swear we mean no offense to the deaf community or other caption users.

Adventures in Advocacy for Video Description

Posted by Kate on October 7, 2013 at 12:51 pm. Consumer Advisory Board, Techy, Video Description

Ah, Fall — the crisp air, leaves crunching underfoot, the change in nature’s color scheme, boots and jackets, football games, and the season premieres of my favorite TV shows and new series.   Who doesn’t love a little added humor, drama, or information in their day?  Count me in.

Watching television in my household requires some adaptations, namely captioning, as three of five of my family members are deaf/hard of hearing.  Captions are vital for our understanding and enjoyment of programming.  But I also love Video Description for those who are blind or have visual impairments.  It improves my vocabulary, draws attention to detail in the program that I might have missed, and is an overall rich sensory experience.   Just like captions allow access to media for those without hearing, Video Description is necessary for those without vision to understand and enjoy TV programming.

As I tuned in the third week of September to the prime time season premieres, I was quickly disappointed that I had no Video Description.  Not only that, but when I activated the feature through my SAP menu, I had no audio at all.  A search on-line to see if I had not activated my Video Description correctly revealed nothing.  I called my provider, Direct TV, and re-set my receiver box, but still no Description.  Customer service gave me the number for the Descriptive Video Service at Direct TV, which is a voicemail box for Captioning Services.  A nice gentleman named Charlie called me back and said he would investigate and to try it again during prime time Thursday evening.  That night was a repeat of the other two without Description and I called on Friday morning to report my results to Charlie.  His investigation revealed a transmission problem with the Descriptive Audio feed for the entire Atlanta area.  The local affiliate was diagnosing and hopefully resolving the problem.  I don’t know if the problem affected all cable providers or just mine, but it was widespread.

Week two of the Fall Season Premieres:  Monday night prime time again disappoints, and Tuesday morning I leave a message with Charlie that I now have audio through the SAP feature, but no Video Description.

And finally, as I tune in Tuesday night, I am thrilled to hear Video Description!  It is fixed!  I am grateful that I was directed to the right department and that Mr. Charlie listened, persisted, and had the resources/power to resolve the issue.

Here is what helped me in this adventure in advocacy and might help you too:

  • Identify the Problem
  • Brainstorm Solutions and Resources
  • Ask for Help
  • Practice Diligence

Happy TV watching, caption reading, and listening to Video Description!

– Michelle Rich
CaptionMax Community Advisory Board Member

Ardis Bazyn and the search for Audio Description

Posted by Kate on July 2, 2013 at 2:01 pm. Consumer Advisory Board, Video Describers, Video Description

Ardis Bazyn is a blind speaker, coach and writer and one of our cherished Community Advisory Board members.  Between numerous writing projects, seminars and speaking events, she’s somehow found the time to write a piece for our blog describing her search for audio description in her area.  Thanks, Ardis!


Recently, there were some members of a chapter in northern CA who were doing some advocacy work at a local movie chain that didn’t provide audio description for any movies. Since I hadn’t seen a movie in my city recently, I asked about them and found out that the theater no longer had them while transferring to digital mode. It made me reflect on the options we have available as visually impaired movie and play watchers.

Audio described movies and plays are wonderful to watch for those of us without any vision. However, it is difficult to go to a movie or play at the last minute. Besides having to locate an audio described event close to where I live, there is the matter of the short amount of time the particular show is described. First, I have to receive notification of a movie or play in which I have some interest. If I have received no notification, I have to call the two theaters which I know have occasional plays or call the local movie theaters or ask my husband to do some research. Lucky for me, he doesn’t mind.

Once I’ve heard about a possible play or movie, the search isn’t over. There is the transportation issue. If the play or movie isn’t playing in my neighborhood, I have to determine if I can get a bus, train or Parra transit to the event.

The final issue is my schedule. When I’m in town, free from other commitments, the choice of the described movie or play isn’t often to my liking.

So what is the solution? We need more description on TV and on DVDs I can purchase. It isn’t easy to find DVDs with the audio described track. It isn’t easy to know what shows on TV have audio description. Even if I have heard about a show that has description, I cannot access it on my cable HDTV box since my husband and I like to save programs to watch later.

What is my wish for the future? I’m hoping some of the new audio description possibilities will push the audio description field along so much that we can find audio description all over. What a great day that will be.

A great day, indeed!  Thanks again, Ardis.  You can read more about Ardis’ life and work at: bazyncommunications.com

Hosting A Read Captions Across America Event

Posted by Kate on April 15, 2013 at 9:00 am. Captioning, Consumer Advisory Board

Each year during the first week of March, the birthday of Dr. Seuss is celebrated in schools across the country in a National Education Association Read Across America event.  The Described and Captioned Media Program (DCMP) has launched a brilliant version of the event called Read Captions Across America to promote media literacy via captioning.  Springboarding from this theme, I approached the Library Media Specialist at my son’s elementary school about hosting a similar event.  She enthusiastically agreed. Permissions were granted from the principals, and the planning began for our event at Welch Elementary in Newnan, Georgia.

Dr. Seuss-themed treats in a classroom

Dr. Seuss-themed treats in a classroom

As a parent of two deaf/hard of hearing (d/hh) college- and high-school age students and one elementary-age hearing student, I recognize the benefits of captioning for all students. Prior to moving to Georgia, I worked as an Educational Captionist in a school district that had a large student body that was deaf/hard of hearing.  While there, I facilitated an RCAA event for our neighborhood elementary school.   I am grateful for all that captioning has done and continues to do for my family in providing a bridge to a world of information and feel that it is a responsibility and privilege to spread the word to families of children with and without hearing loss.   For me, being an accessibility advocate is a role, whether paid or voluntary, that I take seriously and choose to fulfill enthusiastically.

At Welch, a school serving around 870 students, some of which are d/hh or blind/low-vision, I saw a wonderful opportunity to introduce the idea of using captioned media as an educational tool in the classroom and at home.

In late February, I wrote a letter to parents extoling the benefits of captioned media from research done by fellow Consumer Advisory Board Member Carl Jensema.  Improved reading and listening comprehension, enhanced word recognition and decoding of words, assistance in acquiring new vocabulary, reinforcement of spelling and grammar, and overall enjoyment in reading are a few of the many benefits of utilizing captioned media with students.  Directions for how to activate captions on television and DVDs were included.  A similar letter was written to school staff to get everyone on board with the advantages of utilizing accessible media for all students in the classroom.

The DCMP sent posters with three different themes advertising the event to be placed around the school.  They also provided bookmarks for each student and certificates for classroom participation.

Welch Elementary Library entrance with one of the newly designed DCMP posters

Welch Elementary Library entrance with one of the newly designed DCMP posters

On March 1, we sent a broadcast segment throughout the school describing captions and how to turn television time into reading time.  The students then watched an accessible version of The Lorax that had been provided by the DCMP.   In the parent letter, each student was challenged to watch captioned media at home and turn in a raffle ticket to be entered into a drawing for prizes.  The classes with the most participation received a cupcake party and individual winners received prizes that included a Cat in the Hat plush toy, The Lorax DVD with accessibility features, and popcorn and movie candy for a family movie night.

Jennifer Beard (Library Media Specialist) and I kicking off our event on RCAA Day from the Welch Elementary Bulldog Broadcast Network

Jennifer Beard (Library Media Specialist) and I kicking off our event on RCAA Day from the Welch Elementary Bulldog Broadcast Network

The project exceeded my expectations.  Prior to the event, very few classrooms had their captions activated or were watching DVDs with subtitles.  Post event, most classrooms have the accessibility features activated.  The project seems to have raised awareness about the many benefits of utilizing accessible media at home and at school with parents, students, and staff for both d/hh and hearing; sighted or blind/low-vision. It has provided positive experiences with accessible media that can be continued at home.   Visual reminders remain throughout the school in posters and certificates proudly displayed by teachers.  My favorite raffle ticket comment came from a 3rd grader: “I love captioned reading!  I think it is very important to some people!  Thanks for doing Read Captions Across America for Welch!  Love, Leah.”   Time well spent.

Jennifer Beard (Library Media Specialist), Kevin Banks, Harper Powell, Michelle Rich in front of the newly designed RCAA poster

Jennifer Beard (Library Media Specialist), Kevin Banks, Harper Powell, Michelle Rich in front of the newly designed RCAA poster

Kosiken, R., R. Wilson, and C.J. Jensema, “Closed-Captioned Television:  A New Tool for Reading Instruction.”  Reading World May 1985:  7.

Community Advisory Board Meeting 2012

Posted by Kate on September 15, 2012 at 12:26 pm. Captioning, Consumer Advisory Board, Video Description

CaptionMax recently hosted its annual Community Advisory Board meeting, where we gather with our board members (Ardis Bazyn, Joya Bromeland, B.J. LeJeune, Cathy Lyle, Joshua Miele, Michelle Rich, Jordan Richardson, and Timothy Smitley) to discuss all things related to media accessibility.  Check out some photos of the day.

This year, we invited our board members to try their hands at video description.  B.J. LeJeune (board member), Donna Horn (Vice President of Business Development), and Michelle Rich (board member) collaborate on writing a script with Jeremy Fisher (Staff Manager, Captioning and Video Description).

Once the scripts were completed, board members spent time in our recording booth bringing their descriptions to life. Jeremy Fisher sets up the mic for Joshua Miele (board member).

Emily Bell (Multimedia Manager and Project Director) and Jess Matelski (Multimedia Specialist) chat with Jordan Richardson (board member) while others are busy in the booth.

Discussions continue over lunch in the CaptionMax diner.

We close our meeting with a viewing of the clip described and voiced by our board members.  They did a fabulous job!

Thanks to everyone for another fantastic meeting.  We look forward to next year!

Water, Water, Everywhere

Posted by Max on April 26, 2012 at 4:11 pm. Captioning, Consumer Advisory Board

One of our fantastic Consumer Advisory Board members, Michelle Rich,  just paid a visit to the  Georgia Aquarium.  Read on to find out what she and her family discovered there!

Megan and Keegan Marvel at Jellyfish

Megan and Keegan Marvel at Jellyfish

An Inclusive Exploration of the Georgia Aquarium

My family recently relocated to beautiful Atlanta, Georgia after living in Kansas for the past 16 years.  For months we have been visiting the landmarks and tourist hot spots, and participating in the rich culture of the South.  Our unanimous favorite is the Georgia Aquarium.  Since three of the five of us have varying levels of hearing loss, our adventures in any new venue involve finding ways to have an inclusive experience.  In this visit to the Aquarium, I wanted to explore the accessibility features for both deaf/hard of hearing with my 16 year old daughter who is hard of hearing and get the basic experience that a blind/low vision visitor might have, even though I am sighted.  We had an exciting day with many barriers to access broken down while at the same time seeing some room for improvement in others.

You Can Really Get INTO The Fish!

You Can Really Get INTO The Fish!

The Georgia Aquarium is the largest in the world, with over 10 million gallons of fresh and marine water and more diverse aquatic life than any other aquarium representing 500 different species.   Whale sharks, manta rays, dolphins, beluga whales, loggerhead sea turtles, penguins, corals, and piranha, to name a few are among the 100,000 animals found at the aquarium.  It is divided into six main galleries:  Cold Water Quest, Tropical Diver, Georgia Explorer, River Scout, Dolphin Tales, and Ocean Voyager.  There is a seventh gallery that is currently running an exhibit on Frogs.

Planning is always a good start for an adventure and we began ours on the website reading about the animals we would encounter and the accessibility features of the aquarium.  The website features animal fact sheets and tutorials, You Tube videos, and live webcams in the various galleries.  The website does not contain captions, but does allow for automatically generated captions.  For consumers of captions, these translations are better than nothing, but do miss the mark in some important areas. For example, on the video titled, “Beluga Whale Pregnancy: Chapter 1,” the audio states that there is a low success rate in cetacean birth whereas the transcription interprets the audio as there is a lot of success in cetacean  birth.  Clearly the transcription does not deliver the intended message here.  Additionally, audio description is needed on all of the videos to fully experience the scenery.  There is a vast amount of educational information available on the website to digest in preparation for the visit.  The website highlights accessibility features for guest with hearing or visual exceptionalities.  It would be helpful to have those features outlined and available for guests at the information booth once you arrive as well.

Each gallery ran an educational video about the exhibit with captions, thus affording access for those with hearing loss.  With all of the ambient sounds in the galleries, the captions are a huge benefit to the hearing guest as well.  An option for audio description would be a valuable addition to the educational videos.  Although we did not request animal models, they are purportedly available in each gallery.  We experienced some tactile wood carvings of animals in the River Scout exhibit.

Captioned Whale Video on Theater

Captions Help Everyone in the Noisy Environment

One of our favorite areas in the aquarium are the touch pools where guests can reach in and feel small bonnethead sharks, stingrays, and shrimp.  There is wheelchair access to the pools and staff members are available to personally assist those with visual exceptionalities.     Staff members narrate the touch pools over a microphone to the audience.  A speech-to-text program to translate the dialogue into text might be something to explore for d/hh guests in this area.

Dolphin Tales is a spectacular 30 minute production incorporating acrobatic dolphins and Broadway-quality singing, dancing, and swimming human performers.  Unfortunately, the show is not captioned nor described.  Large panels are suspended from the ceiling throughout the production and would be an excellent place to display captions.  An audio description available through an IPOD feed would make this production accessible to those who are b/vi.  The addition of these accessibility features would make this a rich sensory experience.

Finally, we took a Behind the Scenes tour of the aquarium and it was an exhilarating experience.  Our tour guide, Jan, was beyond compare.  Before the tour, I explained  that my daughter had hearing loss and that I was hoping to experience all of the tactile elements of the tour as if I were without sight and he responded with a specialized tour for us.  The hallway to the Ocean Voyager area contains sized tactile representations of several of the animals on exhibit.  This would be a valuable experience for the guest who is blind.  We will not forget experiencing the football field sized pool containing a 25-foot-long whale shark from the top of the pool and the accompanying description of all of the marine life below.   Our tour guide was sure to face my daughter when talking to aid her speech reading and the small size of the group, four in total, allowed for one to one communication to take place.  This is another area where perhaps a speech-to-text translation program might be a workable solution.

Fish Outlines Help Teach Sizes and Shapes

Fish Outlines Help Teach Sizes and Shapes

Overall, the Georgia Aquarium has done a really good job of breaking down barriers to access for those with sensory exceptionalities.    There is room for improvement and I plan to share this information with the aquarium and offer my consumer suggestions for improved access.  We had a wonderful day at the aquarium and I can’t wait to go back and explore again.  If you visit the Atlanta area, be sure to put this on the top of your list of things to do.

VDRDC DLN First Annual Meeting – A really long name for a really cool meeting

Posted by Max on April 18, 2012 at 11:22 am. Captioning, Consumer Advisory Board

Ana Forest sent us a great  post about the VDRDC meeting.  Read on for some fascinating info!

Just got back from San Francisco, where we played a leading role in the Video Description Research and Development Center Description Leadership Network’s First Annual Meeting: It was a huge success and an amazingly interesting and useful conference.

We lucked out with great weather, and enjoyed the opportunity to re-connect with old friends, collaborators, and even some of our competition.  A diverse group of industry professionals and consumer organizations gathered to discuss technology, strategies, legislation, and many topics surrounding Video Description.   Our good friend Dr. Josh Miele, the VDRDC director, ran an informative and fun meeting.  He really knows how to bring the subject alive, and the work his center is doing is so important to Video Description and the blind community.  A fully packed agenda ensured that there was something for everyone.  And because CaptionMax is a pioneer and long-time leader in Video Description, as well as a consultant to Dr. Miele and his team, our presence and input was invaluable.

Josh and his team at VDRDC presented their own exciting research projects. We got sneak-peaks of some of the technology and ideas they are working on.  Their crowd-sourced description platform called Descriptive Video Exchange (DVX)  is a cloud-based description repository for authoring and distribution of video annotations.  That is a fancy way to say, DVX can allow anyone to describe any program from anywhere.   Josh and his colleague, Owen Edwards, unveiled their mobile  (smart phone) description project: Choreographed and Orchestrated Video Annotation (COVA).  They are using second-screen technologies to expand description options in the classroom, living room, theater, and work place.  Ender Tekin presented his work in Automated Algorithmic Description (AAD) which uses computer vision techniques to extract visual information for descriptive purposes. The projects they are developing at the center are fascinating, and could bring description to another level.

The agenda was packed with presentations from experts about the benefits of video description as a tool for education, as well as for children with autism, learning disabilities or deaf-blindness.  Along with some of the technical and useful aspects of Video Description, the group discussed social networking, outreach, the new legislation, as well as using Description in museums, theater performances, and anywhere else that a visually impaired person might need it.  Of course this led to an animated conversation about changing the name from Video Description to something else, since it is not just about video.  Should we call it ‘Audio Description’, ‘Media Description’, or maybe even just ‘Description’?  The ideas flew in an energetic and charged discussion, but at the end of this First Annual Meeting, many of us agreed to disagree, and we left it at ‘Video Description’.

Video Description has been around for many years, with CaptionMax being a pioneer and important stakeholder in the industry.   But change is good, and change is here.  It seems that now we are on the precipice of a new era for Video Description.  With CaptionMax firmly in place as a Description Leader, the DLN is a group of individuals and organizations working on the improvements, developments and collaborative efforts necessary to make all media accessible to all people.

As many of our clients and consumers already know, CaptionMax is always on the cutting edge of new technology.   Along with Closed Captioning, our Video Description service is making media easier to understand and more accessible to more people.  Our commitment continues with the VDRDC, as DLN members, consultants, and in this case meeting organizers, too.  We are proud to say that the conference ran without a hitch and a was a big success due to the efforts of our own Director of Business Partnerships, Ana Forest.  Ana was on loan for a few weeks to help plan and execute logistics for this meeting of over 40 attendees from all over North America.  Thanks, Ana!  Great meeting, and good to finally have you back!  With CaptionMax contributing to the behind the scenes planning, Josh really pulled off an incredible agenda with interesting speakers, intriguing topics, and animated breakout sessions.

We’d also like to give a very special thanks to Jo Ann McCann and OSEP- Department of Education, along with John Brabyn and The Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, for making this project possible.

If you haven’t already, you should check out Josh’s website: www.vdrdc.org.  You can read more about his Video Description Research and Development Center, and his work at Smith-Kettlewell’s Eye Research Institute.  The site describes their projects, and the research they are doing at the center.  You can also read some of Josh’s blog posts here on our very own CaptionMax website.

 

Locations

  • Minneapolis, MN
  • (CaptionMax World Headquarters)
  • 2438 27th Avenue South
  • Minneapolis, MN 55406
  • Phone: 612.341.3566
  • Fax: 612.341.2345
  • Burbank, CA
  • 245 East Olive Avenue, Suite 600
  • Burbank, CA 91502
  • Phone: 818.295.2500
  • Fax: 818.295.2509
  • New York, NY
  • 5 Columbus Circle
  • Suite 810
  • New York, NY 10019
  • Phone: 212.462.0060
  • Fax: 212.462.0061